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Shrooms and Alcohol

Can Shrooms and Alcohol go together?

What are the potential effects that could come with mixing the two?

These are some of the questions that are asked by avid users of both Shrooms and alcohol. Both of these substances contain psychoactive elements that you would wonder whether they might cancel or complement each other to produce extraordinary effects. Let’s find out:

Shrooms and Alcohol – Usage

mushrooms-nature-wild-mushrooms-plants
mushrooms-nature-wild-mushrooms-plants

The usage of Shrooms stems from the presence of Psilocybin, a psychedelic prodrug compound that has the ability to alter the functions of your mind. It is costly to remove this compound and use it in its pure form. And since mushrooms that contain are edible, it only makes sense to eat the mushrooms to get the effects of these effects.

The dosage can depend on an array of factors. However, Shrooms almost always produce hallucinogens regardless of how they are consumed and those hallucinogens interfere with the action of serotonin, a brain chemical, which may alter the following:

  • Mood
  • Sleep
  • Body temperature
  • Muscle control
  • Sexual behavior
  • Hunger
  • Mood
  • Sensory perception

The use of alcohol, on another hand, is known for its adverse effects than anything else. Ethanol, the only consumable type of alcohol, contains psychoactive components that alter the functions of the brain. As such, the use of alcohol in acceptable quantities produces such effects as:

  • Mood lift
  • Generalized depression of the CNS (Central Nervous System)
  • Sedation
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Increased sociability
  • Decreased anxiety
  • Euphoria

Alcohol is known mainly for its adverse effects which include psychological problems are destruction of body organs like the liver. A 2017 study by National Survey on Health and Drug Use found that as many as 14.4 million Americans above 12 years are victims of alcohol use disorder (AUD)

The usage of Shrooms stems from the presence of Psilocybin, a psychedelic prodrug compound that has the ability to alter the functions of your mind. It is costly to remove this compound and use it in its pure form. And since mushrooms that contain are edible, it only makes sense to eat the mushrooms to get the effects of these effects.

The dosage can depend on an array of factors. However, Shrooms almost always produce hallucinogens regardless of how they are consumed and those hallucinogens interfere with the action of serotonin, a brain chemical, which may alter the following:

  • Mood
  • Sleep
  • Body temperature
  • Muscle control
  • Sexual behavior
  • Hunger
  • Mood
  • Sensory perception

The use of alcohol, on another hand, is known for its adverse effects than anything else. Ethanol, the only consumable type of alcohol, contains psychoactive components that alter the functions of the brain. As such, the use of alcohol in acceptable quantities produces such effects as:

  • Mood lift
  • Generalized depression of the CNS (Central Nervous System)
  • Sedation
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Increased sociability
  • Decreased anxiety
  • Euphoria

Alcohol is known mainly for its adverse effects which include psychological problems are destruction of body organs like the liver. A 2017 study by National Survey on Health and Drug Use found that as many as 14.4 million Americans above 12 years are victims of alcohol use disorder (AUD)

Shrooms vs Alcohol – Differences and Similarities

What sets Shrooms and Alcohol apart

The user has about 5 ways of consuming mushrooms and magic truffles. Drinking a brew of the mushrooms produces the same effects as mushroom capsules which can be swallowed on the go. The third option entails cooking the mushrooms and eating them as food. It can be in the form of candy, toppings, sauce, magic chocolate truffles, and so on. If you fancy lemon tek, you can add a dose of magic mushrooms and still get all the benefits it brings. Alcohol, on another hand, is primarily taken as a drink – a mode of consumption which boosts its efficacy (because liquids are easier to absorb than solid particles)

Shrooms aren’t as toxic as alcohol

The effects of Shrooms are not as adverse as that of alcohol. In fact, high doses of the magic mushroom can be the key to unlocking greater perception in some users. With proper knowledge, guidance, and experience, magic mushrooms can help the user gain valuable insights about the surrounding environment. But that’s only true if you are an experienced user. Things are a little different with alcohol.

Drunkenness and serious cognitive impartment are the immediate effects of alcohol consumption and have no useful impact on the user. Basically, the beneficial effects of alcohol are very limited and, more often than not, comes at a cost – addiction which can, in turn, lead to liver cirrhosis and an array of other health problems. Because magic mushrooms are not as toxic as alcohol, they are considered the “safest drug in the world” and a better alternative to alcohol.

Psilocybin, the main psychoactive component of Shrooms has numerous medical benefits including relieving obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, and headache although FDA hasn’t approved them yet. Alcohol, on another hand, has very limited, if any, medical benefits.

What is common between Shrooms and Alcohol

Just like anything else that alters the functions of the brain and produces the “feel good” effect, both Shrooms and alcohol cause their users to get hooked to them (addiction). If you compare the two side by side, however, alcohol turns out to be more addictive than Shrooms.

Both shrooms and alcohol come with psychoactive components that alter the proper functioning of the mind -psilocybin is to Shrooms what ethanol is to alcoholic beverages.

While most other substances that have been classed as drugs, alcohol and shrooms are legal in all states in the United States. The only potential barrier to access to alcohol is the age of the buyer – the legal age is 18 years in most states. For shrooms, virtually all states permit access to them regardless of age.

Studies show that addiction to any drug increases the likelihood that the individual will be addicted to other drugs. The same applies to shrooms and alcohol – an addiction to either substance exposes the individual to other drugs. For example, alcohol addicts are more prone to venture into smoking and vice versa. Users of shrooms tend to have an affinity for recreational marijuana and vice versa but the likelihood is low to those who have never use the two.

Can you mix shrooms with alcohol?

It is perfectly OK to mix shrooms and alcohol but that’s going require you to put a lot of things into considerations. The results often turn out different compared to taking each individually. To some people, taking a few drinks (say two 2 vodka mixers) and taking shrooms thereafter produces a canceling effect, where the latter ends up sobering out the person. Some users report feeling calm and dreamy when they take the two together. Most users, however, agree that getting drunk ad taking shrooms thereafter is not the best way to get yourself drunk as the two tend to cancel each other. Only a small number of users report feeling the full effects of the two when taken together. Also, a small number of users report remaining alert and agitated the entire when they take shrooms and alcohol together.

Whether you wish to take the two together or one after another, it is sensible to conclude that the two drugs are less likely to add up to something stronger. So yeah, it is perfectly okay and safe to combine shrooms and alcohol.

Also Read:

Can You Smoke Shrooms?

Conclusion

mushrooms-close-up-wild-mushrooms

Although both alcohol and shrooms contain psychoactive components, they don’t necessarily have the same effects on the user. The effects of alcohol or more adverse compared to those of shrooms. Can you mix shrooms with alcohol? Yes. And if you mix alcohol mix shrooms, either one after another or all in one mix, they are less likely to result in anything stronger.

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